What will it take?

David sits cross-legged in the rocking chair opposite me, slender fingers clasped in his lap. He’s a tall man, lean and quiet. I have not known him long, but I can tell you that he is persistent and consistent with what he believes. He is watchful, observant…a good listener.

He regards me quietly for a moment or two…long enough for me to wonder why he has come.

“So,” he finally says, “what do you think it will take to win this?”

He is speaking of the shale gas war, of course.

{war: noun, often attributive \ˈwr\  –  a struggle or competition between opposing forces or for a particular end}

A war of profit and power vs people…one that often keeps me awake at night and compels volunteers all over this province to devote time, personal finances, energy and emotion to repeating the message:

These things we value…they are not for sale.
Our health…can never be for sale.

Extra-ordinary people…warriors, really…

notforsaleI patter on for awhile about demonstrations to discourage the industry, and the power of the public voice, but eventually run out of words.

“What about you? What do you think it will take?”

This is his cue. The reason he came. He begins slowly, telling me about the legal action his group of volunteers – NB Water First – wishes to pursue.

Their plan is to file an ‘quia timet’ injunction against the Province because there is a future probability of injury to our rights and interests if unconventional shale gas drilling using horizontal hydro-fracking is pursued.

Within environmental law,  the ‘Precautionary Principle’ states if an action or policy has a suspected risk of causing harm to the public or to the environment, in the absence of scientific consensus that the action or policy is harmful, the burden of proof that it is not harmful falls on those taking an act.

I don’t understand much about the legalities of such things, so he answers my questions clearly and simply. It seems that they have thought through all the angles.

 “What if you are not successful?” I ask.

“Then, at least, the facts will have been thoroughly reported in the media, which has not happened so far.”

I stop and consider for a moment:  ordinary New Brunswickers must take our government to court to protect our health, communities and environment. Of course, this would be national news.

For more than two years, David’s group and others have worked to raise $30,000 of their first level goal of $100,000. They expect the action to require $500,000 total.

The challenge, David says, is getting people to part with their money. It would only take 5000 people who are willing to spend $100 to protect their health and environment.

This is our best chance of stopping this industry.

‘How many hours have you put into this already?’ he asks me.

Too many. But still, not enough.Thousands of hours have been spent by hundreds of people researching, making presentations, planning, traveling, attending meetings and teleconferences, writing letters, talking to people, sharing information.

“If you could spend $100 to have this thing resolved without having to do anything else, would that be worth it to you?”

In a heartbeat.  I’m ready to write a cheque.

David tells me that his group has held yard sales, plant sales, an art sale. The plant sale, he says worked the best – people love plants – they raised $1200, whereas the yard sale only netted them $850.

artsalePlant sales. Yard sales.

I feel a lump rise in my throat.

This small group of committed people have been selling signs and holding yard sales for two years to raise the funds to protect my right to say ‘No’ to something that threatens my heath, my home, my community,  my future.

Meanwhile, the people we pay to protect those same rights are blithely choosing industry over the voice of the people who have the most to lose. And thinking themselves noble in the defense of jobs and economy.  Bringing New Brunswickers back home.

To what?  For what?

{noble:  adjective \ˈnō-bəl\ – of excellent character, having lofty ideals, courageous spirit.}

Noble is when people, who have everything to lose, donate their own hard-earned income and precious time, holding yard sales to raise the funds to protect the future of New Brunswick.

So this is why we continue to oppose gas and oil development in NB…because there are many people all over this province who, like David, are putting their heart and soul and finances into protecting this land for us all.

So the question is this:  Will you help us?fracking_health

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